Publikationen

Hier finden Sie von Know-Center MitarbeiterInnen verfasste wissenschaftliche Publikationen

2016

Lindstaedt Stefanie , Ley Tobias, Klamma Ralf, Wild Fridolin

Learning analytics for workplace and professional learning

Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Learning Analytics & Knowledge, ACM, 2016

Konferenz
Recognizing the need for addressing the rather fragmented character of research in this field, we have held a workshop on learning analytics for workplace and professional learning at the Learning Analytics and Knowledge (LAK) Conference. The workshop has taken a broad perspective, encompassing approaches from a number of previous traditions, such as adaptive learning, professional online communities, workplace learning and performance analytics. Being co-located with the LAK conference has provided an ideal venue for addressing common challenges and for benefiting from the strong research on learning analytics in other sectors that LAK has established. Learning Analytics for Workplace and Professional Learning is now on the research agenda of several ongoing EU projects, and therefore a number of follow-up activities are planned for strengthening integration in this emerging field.
2016

Dennerlein Sebastian, Treasure-Jones Tamsin, Lex Elisabeth, Ley Tobias

The role of collaboration and shared understanding in interprofessional teamwork

AMEE - International Conference of Medical Education 2016, AMEE 2016, 2016

Journal
Background: Teamworking, within and acrosshealthcare organisations, is essential to deliverexcellent integrated care. Drawing upon an alternationof collaborative and cooperative phases, we exploredthis teamworking and respective technologicalsupport within UK Primary Care. Participants usedBits&Pieces (B&P), a sensemaking tool for tracedexperiences that allows sharing results and mutuallyelaborating them: i.e. cooperating and/orcollaborating.Summary of Work: We conducted a two month-longcase study involving six healthcare professionals. InB&P, they reviewed organizational processes, whichrequired the involvement of different professions ineither collaborative and/or cooperative manner. Weused system-usage data, interviews and qualitativeanalysis to understand the interplay of teamworkingpracticeand technology.Summary of Results: Within our analysis we mainlyidentified cooperation phases. In a f2f-meeting,professionals collaboratively identified subtasks andassigned individuals leading collaboration on them.However, these subtasks were undertaken asindividual sensemaking efforts and finally combined(i.e. cooperation). We found few examples ofreciprocal interpretation processes (i.e. collaboration):e.g. discussing problems during sensemaking ormonitoring other’s sensemaking-outcomes to makesuggestions.Discussion: These patterns suggest that collaborationin healthcare often helps to construct a minimalshared understanding (SU) of subtasks to engage incooperation, where individuals trust in other’scompetencies and autonomous completion. However,we also found that professionals with positivecollaboration history and deepened SU were willing toundertake subtasks collaboratively. It seems thatacquiring such deepened SU of concepts andmethods, leads to benefits that motivate professionalsto collaborate more.Conclusion: Healthcare is a challenging environmentrequiring interprofessional work across organisations.For effective teamwork, a deepened SU is crucial andboth cooperation and collaboration are required.However, we found a tendency of staff to rely mainlyon cooperation when working in teams and not fullyexplore benefits of collaboration.Take Home Messages: To maximise benefits ofinterprofessional working, tools for teamworkingshould support both cooperation and collaborationprocesses and scaffold the move between them
2016

Trattner Christoph, Kowald Dominik, Seitlinger Paul, Ley Tobias

Modeling Activation Processes in Human Memory to Predict the Reuse of Tags

The Journal of Web Science, James Finlay, NOW publishing, 2016

Journal
Several successful tag recommendation mechanisms have been developed, including algorithms built upon Collaborative Filtering, Tensor Factorization, graph-based and simple "most popular tags" approaches. From an economic perspective, the latter approach has been convincing since calculating frequencies is computationally efficient and effective with respect to different recommender evaluation metrics. In this paper, we introduce a tag recommendation algorithm that mimics the way humans draw on items in their long-term memory in order to extend these conventional "most popular tags" approaches. Based on a theory of human memory, the approach estimates a tag's reuse probability as a function of usage frequency and recency in the user's past (base-level activation) as well as of the current semantic context (associative component).Using four real-world folksonomies gathered from bookmarks in BibSonomy, CiteULike, Delicious and Flickr, we show how refining frequency-based estimates by considering recency and semantic context outperforms conventional "most popular tags" approaches and another existing and very effective but less theory-driven, time-dependent recommendation mechanism. By combining our approach with a simple resource-specific frequency analysis, our algorithm outperforms other well-established algorithms, such as Collaborative Filtering, FolkRank and Pairwise Interaction Tensor Factorization with respect to recommender accuracy and runtime. We conclude that our approach provides an accurate and computationally efficient model of a user's temporal tagging behavior. Moreover, we demonstrate how effective principles of recommender systems can be designed and implemented if human memory processes are taken into account.
2016

Dennerlein Sebastian, Ley Tobias, , Lex Elisabeth, Seitlinger Paul

Take up my Tags: Exploring Benefits of Collaborative Learning in a Social Tagging Field Study at the Workplace

European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning (EC-TEL 2016), EC-TEL 2016, Springer-Verlag, Cham, 2016

Konferenz
In the digital realm, meaning making is reflected in the reciprocal manipulation of mediating artefacts. We understand uptake, i.e. interaction with and understanding of others’ artefact interpretations, as central mechanism and investigate its impact on individual and social learning at work. Results of our social tagging field study indicate that increased uptake of others’ tags is related to a higher shared understanding of collaborators as well as narrower and more elaborative exploration in individual information search. We attribute the social and individual impact to accommodative processes in the high uptake condition.
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