Publikationen

Hier finden Sie von Know-Center MitarbeiterInnen verfasste wissenschaftliche Publikationen

2015

Kraker Peter, Lindstaedt Stefanie , Schlögl C., Jack K.

Visualization of co-readership patterns from an online reference management system

Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, NULL, 2015

Journal
In this paper, we analyze the adequacy and applicability of readership statistics recorded in social reference management systems for creating knowledge domain visualizations. First, we investigate the distribution of subject areas in user libraries of educational technology researchers on Mendeley. The results show that around 69% of the publications in an average user library can be attributed to a single subject area. Then, we use co-readership patterns to map the field of educational technology. The resulting visualization prototype, based on the most read publications in this field on Mendeley, reveals 13 topic areas of educational technology research. The visualization is a recent representation of the field: 80% of the publications included were published within ten years of data collection. The characteristics of the readers, however, introduce certain biases to the visualization. Knowledge domain visualizations based on readership statistics are therefore multifaceted and timely, but it is important that the characteristics of the underlying sample are made transparent.
2015

Kraker Peter, Lex Elisabeth, Gorraiz Juan, Gumpenberger Christian, Peters Isabella

Research Data Explored II: the Anatomy and Reception of figshare

Proceedings of the 20th International Conference on Science and Technology Indicators (STI 2015), Lugano, Schweiz, 2015

Konferenz
2015

Buschmann Katrin, Kasberger Stefan, Mayer Katja, Reckling Falk, Rieck Katharina, Vignoli Michela, Kraker Peter

Open Science in Austria: Approaches and Status

Information. Wissenschaft und Praxis, DeGruyter, 2015

Journal
Insbesondere in den letzten zwei Jahren hat Österreichim Bereich Open Science, vor allem was Open Accessund Open Data betrifft, nennenswerte Fortschritte gemacht.Die Gründung des Open Access Networks Austria(OANA) und das Anfang 2014 gestartete Projekt e-InfrastructuresAustria können als wichtige Grundsteine fürden Ausbau einer österreichischen Open-Science-Landschaftgesehen werden. Auch das österreichische Kapitelder Open Knowledge Foundation leistet in den BereichenOpen Science Praxis- und Bewusstseinsbildung grundlegendeArbeit. Unter anderem bilden diese Initiativendie Grundlage für den Aufbau einer nationalen Open-Access-Strategie sowie einer ganz Österreich abdeckendenInfrastruktur für Open Access und Open (Research) Data.Dieser Beitrag gibt einen Überblick über diese und ähnlichenationale sowie lokale Open-Science-Projekte und-Initiativen und einen Ausblick in die mögliche Zukunftvon Open Science in Österreich.
2015

Vignoli Michela, Kraker Peter, Sevault A.

Paving the way for Science 2.0: top-down and bottom-up approaches

International Conference for E-Democracy and Open Government (CEDEM'15), Krems, Austria, 2015

Konferenz
Science 2.0 is the current trend towards using Web 2.0 tools in research and practising a more open science. We are currently at the beginning of a transition phase in which traditional structures, processes, value systems, and means of science communication are being put to the proof. New strategies and models under the label of “open” are being explored and partly implemented. This situation implies a number of insecurities for scientists as well as for policy makers and demands a rethinking and overcoming of some habits and conventions persisting since an era before the internet. This paper lists current barriers to practising Open Science from the point of view of researchers and reflects which measures could help overcoming them. The central question is which initiatives should be taken on institutional or political level and which ones on level of the community or the individual scientist to support the transition to Science 2.0.
2015

Kraker Peter, Enkhbayar Asuraa, Lex Elisabeth

Exploring Coverage and Distribution of Identifiers on the Scholarly Web

Proceedings of the 14th International Symposium of Information Science - ISI 2015, Zadar, Croatia, 2015

Konferenz
In a scientific publishing environment that is increasingly moving online,identifiers of scholarly work are gaining in importance. In this paper, weanalysed identifier distribution and coverage of articles from the discipline ofquantitative biology using arXiv, Mendeley and CrossRef as data sources.The results show that when retrieving arXiv articles from Mendeley, we wereable to find more papers using the DOI than the arXiv ID. This indicates thatDOI may be a better identifier with respect to findability. We also find thatcoverage of articles on Mendeley decreases in the most recent years, whereasthe coverage of DOIs does not decrease in the same order of magnitude. Thishints at the fact that there is a certain time lag involved, before articles arecovered in crowd-sourced services on the scholarly web.
2015

Kraker Peter, Schlögl C. , Jack K., Lindstaedt Stefanie

The Quest for Keeping an Overview: Knowledge Domain Visualizations based on Co-Readership Patterns

In: Science 2.0, IEEE Computer Society Special Technical Community on Social Networking E-Letter, vol. 3, no. 1, 2015

Journal
Given the enormous amount of scientific knowledgethat is produced each and every day, the need for better waysof gaining – and keeping – an overview of research fields isbecoming more and more apparent. In a recent paper publishedin the Journal of Informetrics [1], we analyze the adequacy andapplicability of readership statistics recorded in social referencemanagement systems for creating such overviews. First, weinvestigated the distribution of subject areas in user librariesof educational technology researchers on Mendeley. The resultsshow that around 69% of the publications in an average userlibrary can be attributed to a single subject area. Then, we usedco-readership patterns to map the field of educational technology.The resulting knowledge domain visualization, based on the mostread publications in this field on Mendeley, reveals 13 topicareas of educational technology research. The visualization isa recent representation of the field: 80% of the publicationsincluded were published within ten years of data collection. Thecharacteristics of the readers, however, introduce certain biasesto the visualization. Knowledge domain visualizations based onreadership statistics are therefore multifaceted and timely, but itis important that the characteristics of the underlying sample aremade transparent.
2015

Peters Isabella, Kraker Peter, Lex Elisabeth, Gumpenberger Christian, Gorraiz, Juan

Research Data Explored: Citations versus Altmetrics

15th International Conference on Scientometrics and Informetrics, Online, 2015

Konferenz
The study explores the citedness of research data, its distribution over time and how it is related to the availability of a DOI (Digital Object Identifier) in Thomson Reuters' DCI (Data Citation Index). We investigate if cited research data "impact" the (social) web, reflected by altmetrics scores, and if there is any relationship between the number of citations and the sum of altmetrics scores from various social media-platforms. Three tools are used to collect and compare altmetrics scores, i.e. PlumX, ImpactStory, and Altmetric.com. In terms of coverage, PlumX is the most helpful altmetrics tool. While research data remain mostly uncited (about 85%), there has been a growing trend in citing data sets published since 2007. Surprisingly, the percentage of the number of cited research data with a DOI in DCI has decreased in the last years. Only nine repositories account for research data with DOIs and two or more citations. The number of cited research data with altmetrics scores is even lower (4 to 9%) but shows a higher coverage of research data from the last decade. However, no correlation between the number of citations and the total number of altmetrics scores is observable. Certain data types (i.e. survey, aggregate data, and sequence data) are more often cited and receive higher altmetrics scores.
2015

Kraker Peter

Educational Technology as Seen Through the Eyes of the Readers

International Journal of Technology Enhanced Learning, Inderscience Publishers, 2015

Journal
In this paper, I present the evaluation of a novel knowledge domain visualization of educational technology. The interactive visualization is based on readership patterns in the online reference management system Mendeley. It comprises of 13 topic areas, spanning psychological, pedagogical, and methodological foundations, learning methods and technologies, and social and technological developments. The visualization was evaluated with (1) a qualitative comparison to knowledge domain visualizations based on citations, and (2) expert interviews. The results show that the co-readership visualization is a recent representation of pedagogical and psychological research in educational technology. Furthermore, the co-readership analysis covers more areas than comparable visualizations based on co-citation patterns. Areas related to computer science, however, are missing from the co-readership visualization and more research is needed to explore the interpretations of size and placement of research areas on the map.
2015

Kraker Peter, Schlögl Christian, Jack Kris, Lindstaedt Stefanie

The Quest for Keeping an Overview: Knowledge Domain Visualizations based on Co-Readership Patterns

2015

Given the enormous amount of scientific knowledge that is produced each and every day, the need for better ways of gaining–and keeping–an overview of research fields is becoming more and more apparent. In a recent paper published in the Journal of Informetrics [1], we analyze the adequacy and applicability of readership statistics recorded in social reference management systems for creating such overviews. First, we investigated the distribution of subject areas in user libraries of educational technology researchers on Mendeley. The results show that around 69% of the publications in an average user library can be attributed to a single subject area. Then, we used co-readership patterns to map the field of educational technology. The resulting knowledge domain visualization, based on the most read publications in this field on Mendeley, reveals 13 topic areas of educational technology research. The visualization is a recent representation of the field: 80% of the publications included were published within ten years of data collection. The characteristics of the readers, however, introduce certain biases to the visualization. Knowledge domain visualizations based on readership statistics are therefore multifaceted and timely, but it is important that the characteristics of the underlying sample are made transparent.
Kontakt Karriere

Hiermit erkläre ich ausdrücklich meine Einwilligung zum Einsatz und zur Speicherung von Cookies. Weiter Informationen finden sich unter Datenschutzerklärung

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close