Publikationen

Hier finden Sie von Know-Center MitarbeiterInnen verfasste wissenschaftliche Publikationen

2018

Lacic Emanuel, Traub Matthias, Duricic Tomislav, Haslauer Eva, Lex Elisabeth

Gone in 30 Days! Predictions for Car Import Planning

it - Information Technology, De Gruyter Oldenbourg, 2018

Journal
A challenge for importers in the automobile industry is adjusting to rapidly changing market demands. In this work, we describe a practical study of car import planning based on the monthly car registrations in Austria. We model the task as a data driven forecasting problem and we implement four different prediction approaches. One utilizes a seasonal ARIMA model, while the other is based on LSTM-RNN and both compared to a linear and seasonal baselines. In our experiments, we evaluate the 33 different brands by predicting the number of registrations for the next month and for the year to come.
2018

d'Aquin Mathie , Kowald Dominik, Fessl Angela, Thalmann Stefan, Lex Elisabeth

AFEL - Analytics for Everyday Learning

Proceedings of the International Projects Track co-located with the 27th International World Wide Web Conference, ACM, Lyon, France, 2018

Konferenz
The goal of AFEL is to develop, pilot and evaluate methods and applications, which advance informal/collective learning as it surfaces implicitly in online social environments. The project is following a multi-disciplinary, industry-driven approach to the analysis and understanding of learner data in order to personalize, accelerate and improve informal learning processes. Learning Analytics and Educational Data Mining traditionally relate to the analysis and exploration of data coming from learning environments, especially to understand learners' behaviours. However, studies have for a long time demonstrated that learning activities happen outside of formal educational platforms, also. This includes informal and collective learning usually associated, as a side effect, with other (social) environments and activities. Relying on real data from a commercially available platform, the aim of AFEL is to provide and validate the technological grounding and tools for exploiting learning analytics on such learning activities. This will be achieved in relation to cognitive models of learning and collaboration, which are necessary to the understanding of loosely defined learning processes in online social environments. Applying the skills available in the consortium to a concrete set of live, industrial online social environments, AFEL will tackle the main challenges of informal learning analytics through 1) developing the tools and techniques necessary to capture information about learning activities from (not necessarily educational) online social environments; 2) creating methods for the analysis of such informal learning data, based on combining feature engineering and visual analytics with cognitive models of learning and collaboration; and 3) demonstrating the potential of the approach in improving the understanding of informal learning, and the way it is better supported; 4) evaluate all the former items in real world large scale applications and platforms.
2018

Kowald Dominik, Seitlinger Paul , Ley Tobias , Lex Elisabeth

The Impact of Semantic Context Cues on the User Acceptance of Tag Recommendations: An Online Study

Companion Proceedings of the 27th International World Wide Web Conference, ACM, Lyon, France, 2018

Konferenz
In this paper, we present the results of an online study with the aim to shed light on the impact that semantic context cues have on the user acceptance of tag recommendations. Therefore, we conducted a work-integrated social bookmarking scenario with 17 university employees in order to compare the user acceptance of a context-aware tag recommendation algorithm called 3Layers with the user acceptance of a simple popularity-based baseline. In this scenario, we validated and verified the hypothesis that semantic context cues have a higher impact on the user acceptance of tag recommendations in a collaborative tagging setting than in an individual tagging setting. With this paper, we contribute to the sparse line of research presenting online recommendation studies.
2018

Lacic Emanuel, Kowald Dominik, Reter-Haas Markus, Slawicek Valentin, Lex Elisabeth

Beyond Accuracy Optimization: On the Value of Item Embeddings for Student Job Recommendation

In Proceedings of the International Workshop on Multi-dimensional Information Fusion for User Modeling and Personalization (IFUP'2018) co-located with the 11th ACM International Conference on Web Search and Data Mining, WSDM'2018, ACM, Los Angeles, USA, 2018

Konferenz
In this work, we address the problem of recommending jobs touniversity students. For this, we explore the impact of using itemembeddings for a content-based job recommendation system. Fur-thermore, we utilize a model from human memory theory to integratethe factors of frequency and recency of job posting interactions forcombining item embeddings. We evaluate our job recommendationsystem on a dataset of the Austrian student job portal Studo usingprediction accuracy, diversity as well as adapted novelty, which isintroduced in this work. We find that utilizing frequency and recencyof interactions with job postings for combining item embeddingsresults in a robust model with respect to accuracy and diversity, butalso provides the best adapted novelty results
2018

Hasani-Mavriqi Ilire, Kowald Dominik, Helic Denis, Lex Elisabeth

Consensus Dynamics in Online Collaboration Systems

Journal of Computational Social Networks , Ding-Zhu Du and My T. Thai, Springer Open, 2018

Journal
In this paper, we study the process of opinion dynamics and consensus building inonline collaboration systems, in which users interact with each other followingtheir common interests and their social pro les. Speci cally, we are interested inhow users similarity and their social status in the community, as well as theinterplay of those two factors inuence the process of consensus dynamics. Forour study, we simulate the di usion of opinions in collaboration systems using thewell-known Naming Game model, which we extend by incorporating aninteraction mechanism based on user similarity and user social status. Weconduct our experiments on collaborative datasets extracted from the Web. Our ndings reveal that when users are guided by their similarity to other users, theprocess of consensus building in online collaboration systems is delayed. Asuitable increase of inuence of user social status on their actions can in turnfacilitate this process. In summary, our results suggest that achieving an optimalconsensus building process in collaboration systems requires an appropriatebalance between those two factors.
2017

Wilsdon James , Bar-Ilan Judit, Frodemann Robert, Lex Elisabeth, Peters Isabella , Wouters Paul

Next-generation altmetrics: responsible metrics and evaluation for open science

European Union, 2017

Journal
2017

Kopeinik Simone, Lex Elisabeth, Seitlinger Paul, Tschinkel, Ley Tobias

Supporting collaborative learning with tag recommendations: a real-world study in an inquiry-based classroom project

Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Learning Analytics and Knowledge (LAK 2017), ACM, Vancouver, 2017

Konferenz
In online social learning environments, tagging has demonstratedits potential to facilitate search, to improve recommendationsand to foster reflection and learning.Studieshave shown that shared understanding needs to be establishedin the group as a prerequisite for learning. We hypothesisethat this can be fostered through tag recommendationstrategies that contribute to semantic stabilization.In this study, we investigate the application of two tag recommendersthat are inspired by models of human memory:(i) the base-level learning equation BLL and (ii) Minerva.BLL models the frequency and recency of tag use while Minervais based on frequency of tag use and semantic context.We test the impact of both tag recommenders on semanticstabilization in an online study with 56 students completinga group-based inquiry learning project in school. Wefind that displaying tags from other group members contributessignificantly to semantic stabilization in the group,as compared to a strategy where tags from the students’individual vocabularies are used. Testing for the accuracyof the different recommenders revealed that algorithms usingfrequency counts such as BLL performed better whenindividual tags were recommended. When group tags wererecommended, the Minerva algorithm performed better. Weconclude that tag recommenders, exposing learners to eachother’s tag choices by simulating search processes on learners’semantic memory structures, show potential to supportsemantic stabilization and thus, inquiry-based learning ingroups.
2017

Kowald Dominik, Kopeinik Simone , Lex Elisabeth

The TagRec Framework as a Toolkit for the Development of Tag-Based Recommender Systems

International Conference on User Modeling, Adaptation and Personalization 2017, UMAP'2017, ACM, Bratislava, 2017

Konferenz
Recommender systems have become important tools to support users in identifying relevant content in an overloaded information space. To ease the development of recommender systems, a number of recommender frameworks have been proposed that serve a wide range of application domains. Our TagRec framework is one of the few examples of an open-source framework tailored towards developing and evaluating tag-based recommender systems. In this paper, we present the current, updated state of TagRec, and we summarize and reƒect on four use cases that have been implemented with TagRec: (i) tag recommendations, (ii) resource recommendations, (iii) recommendation evaluation, and (iv) hashtag recommendations. To date, TagRec served the development and/or evaluation process of tag-based recommender systems in two large scale European research projects, which have been described in 17 research papers. ‘us, we believe that this work is of interest for both researchers and practitioners of tag-based recommender systems.
2017

Lacic Emanuel, Kowald Dominik, Lex Elisabeth

Tailoring Recommendations for a Multi-Domain Environment

ACM International Conference on Recommender Systems 2017, RecSys'2017, ACM, Como, Italy, 2017

Konferenz
Recommender systems are acknowledged as an essential instrumentto support users in finding relevant information. However,the adaptation of recommender systems to multiple domain-specificrequirements and data models still remains an open challenge. Inthe present paper, we contribute to this sparse line of research withguidance on how to design a customizable recommender systemthat accounts for multiple domains with heterogeneous data. Usingconcrete showcase examples, we demonstrate how to setup amulti-domain system on the item and system level, and we reportevaluation results for the domains of (i) LastFM, (ii) FourSquare,and (iii) MovieLens. We believe that our findings and guidelinescan support developers and researchers of recommender systemsto easily adapt and deploy a recommender system in distributedenvironments, as well as to develop and evaluate algorithms suitedfor multi-domain settings
2017

Kowald Dominik, Pujari Subash Chandra, Lex Elisabeth

Temporal Effects on Hashtag Reuse in Twitter: A Cognitive-Inspired Hashtag Recommendation Approach

Proceedings of the 26th International World Wide Web Conference, WWW'2017, ACM, Perth, Western Australia, 2017

Konferenz
Hashtags have become a powerful tool in social platforms such as Twitter to categorize and search for content, and to spread short messages across members of the social network. In this paper, we study temporal hashtag usage practices in Twitter with the aim of designing a cognitive-inspired hashtag recommendation algorithm we call BLLI,S. Our main idea is to incorporate the effect of time on (i) individual hashtag reuse (i.e., reusing own hashtags), and (ii) social hashtag reuse (i.e., reusing hashtags, which has been previously used by a followee) into a predictive model. For this, we turn to the Base-Level Learning (BLL) equation from the cognitive architecture ACT-R, which accounts for the timedependent decay of item exposure in human memory. We validate BLLI,S using two crawled Twitter datasets in two evaluation scenarios. Firstly, only temporal usage patterns of past hashtag assignments are utilized and secondly, these patterns are combined with a content-based analysis of the current tweet. In both evaluation scenarios, we find not only that temporal effects play an important role for both individual and social hashtag reuse but also that our BLLI,S approach provides significantly better prediction accuracy and ranking results than current state-of-the-art hashtag recommendation methods.
2017

Seitlinger Paul, Ley Tobias, Kowald Dominik, Theiler Dieter, Hasani-Mavriqi Ilire, Dennerlein Sebastian, Lex Elisabeth, Albert Dietrich

Balancing the Fluency-Consistency Tradeoff in Collaborative Information Search Using a Recommender Approach

International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, Constantine Stephanidis and Gavriel Salvendy , Taylor and Francis, 2017

Journal
Creative group work can be supported by collaborative search and annotation of Web resources. In this setting, it is important to help individuals both stay fluent in generating ideas of what to search next (i.e., maintain ideational fluency) and stay consistent in annotating resources (i.e., maintain organization). Based on a model of human memory, we hypothesize that sharing search results with other users, such as through bookmarks and social tags, prompts search processes in memory, which increase ideational fluency, but decrease the consistency of annotations, e.g., the reuse of tags for topically similar resources. To balance this tradeoff, we suggest the tag recommender SoMe, which is designed to simulate search of memory from user-specific tag-topic associations. An experimental field study (N = 18) in a workplace context finds evidence of the expected tradeoff and an advantage of SoMe over a conventional recommender in the collaborative setting. We conclude that sharing search results supports group creativity by increasing the ideational fluency, and that SoMe helps balancing the evidenced fluency-consistency tradeoff.
2017

Kowald Dominik, Lex Elisabeth

Overcoming the Imbalance Between Tag Recommendation Approaches and Real-World Folksonomy Structures with Cognitive-Inspired Algorithm

European Symposium on Computational Social Sciences, ESCSS'2017, ACM, London, 2017

Konferenz
In this paper, we study the imbalance between current state-of-the-art tag recommendation algorithms and the folksonomy structures of real-world social tagging systems. While algorithms such as FolkRank are designed for dense folksonomy structures, most social tagging systems exhibit a sparse nature. To overcome this imbalance, we show that cognitive-inspired algorithms, which model the tag vocabulary of a user in a cognitive-plausible way, can be helpful. Our present approach does this via implementing the activation equation of the cognitive architecture ACT-R, which determines the usefulness of units in human memory (e.g., tags). In this sense, our long-term research goal is to design hybrid recommendation approaches, which combine the advantages of both worlds in order to adapt to the current setting (i.e., sparse vs. dense ones)
2017

Traub Matthias, Gursch Heimo, Lex Elisabeth, Kern Roman

Data Market Austria - Austria's First Digital Ecosystem for Data, Businesses, and Innovation

Exploring a changing view on organizing value creation: Developing New Business Models. Contributions to the 2nd International Conference on New Business Models, Institute of Systems Sciences, Innovation and Sustainability Research, Merangasse 18, 8010 Graz, Austria, Graz, 2017

Konferenz
New business opportunities in the digital economy are established when datasets describing a problem, data services solving the said problem, the required expertise and infrastructure come together. For most real-word problems finding the right data sources, services consulting expertise, and infrastructure is difficult, especially since the market players change often. The Data Market Austria (DMA) offers a platform to bring datasets, data services, consulting, and infrastructure offers to a common marketplace. The recommender systems included in DMA analyses all offerings, to derive suggestions for collaboration between them, like which dataset could be best processed by which data service. The suggestions should help the costumers on DMA to identify new collaborations reaching beyond traditional industry boundaries to get in touch with new clients or suppliers in the digital domain. Human brokers will work together with the recommender system to set up data value chains matching different offers to create a data value chain solving the problems in various domains. In its final expansion stage, DMA is intended to be a central hub for all actors participating in the Austrian data economy, regardless of their industrial and research domain to overcome traditional domain boundaries.
2017

d'Aquin Mathieu , Adamou Alessandro , Dietze Stefan , Fetahu Besnik , Gadiraju Ujwal , Hasani-Mavriqi Ilire, Holz Peter, Kümmerle Joachim, Kowald Dominik, Lex Elisabeth, Lopez Sola Susana, Mataran Ricardo, Sabol Vedran, Troullinou Pinelopi, Veas Eduardo

AFEL: Towards Measuring Online Activities Contributions to Self-Directed Learning

7th Workshop on Awareness and Reflection in Technology Enhanced Learning (ARTEL 2017), Kravcik M., Mikroyannidis A., Pammer-Schindler V., Prilla M., CEUR-WS, Tallinn, Estonia, 2017

Konferenz
More and more learning activities take place online in a self-directed manner. Therefore, just as the idea of self-tracking activities for fitness purposes has gained momentum in the past few years, tools and methods for awareness and self-reflection on one's own online learning behavior appear as an emerging need for both formal and informal learners. Addressing this need is one of the key objectives of the AFEL (Analytics for Everyday Learning) project. In this paper, we discuss the different aspects of what needs to be put in place in order to enable awareness and self-reflection in online learning. We start by describing a scenario that guides the work done. We then investigate the theoretical, technical and support aspects that are required to enable this scenario, as well as the current state of the research in each aspect within the AFEL project. We conclude with a discussion of the ongoing plans from the project to develop learner-facing tools that enable awareness and self-reflection for online, self-directed learners. We also elucidate the need to establish further research programs on facets of self-tracking for learning that are necessarily going to emerge in the near future, especially regarding privacy and ethics.
2017

Breitfuß Gert, Kaiser René, Kern Roman, Kowald Dominik, Lex Elisabeth, Pammer-Schindler Viktoria, Veas Eduardo Enrique

i-Know Workshops 2017

CEUR Workshop Proceedings for i-know 2017 conference, CEUR , CEUR, Graz, Austria, 2017

Buch
Proceedings of the Workshop Papers of i-Know 2017, co-located with International Conference on Knowledge Technologies and Data-Driven Business 2017 (i-Know 2017), Graz, Austria, October 11-12, 2017.
2016

Traub Matthias, Lacic Emanuel, Kowald Dominik, Kahr Martin, Lex Elisabeth

Need Help? Recommending Social Care Institutions

Workshop on Recommender Systems and Big Data Analytics co-located with i-know 2016 conference, RSBDA'16, ACM, Graz, 2016

Konferenz
In this paper, we present work-in-progress on a recommender system designed to help people in need find the best suited social care institution for their personal issues. A key requirement in such a domain is to assure and to guarantee the person's privacy and anonymity in order to reduce inhibitions and to establish trust. We present how we aim to tackle this barely studied domain using a hybrid content-based recommendation approach. Our approach leverages three data sources containing textual content, namely (i) metadata from social care institutions, (ii) institution specific FAQs, and (iii) questions that a specific institution has already resolved. Additionally, our approach considers the time context of user questions as well as negative user feedback to previously provided recommendations. Finally, we demonstrate an application scenario of our recommender system in the form of a real-world Web system deployed in Austria.
2016

Stanisavljevic Darko, Hasani-Mavriqi Ilire, Lex Elisabeth, Strohmaier Markus, Helic Denis

Semantic Stability in Wikipedia

Complex Networks and their Applications, Cherifi, H., Gaito, S., Quattrociocchi, W., Sala, A., Springer International Publishing AG, Cham, Switzerland, 2016

Konferenz
In this paper we assess the semantic stability of Wikipedia by investigat-ing the dynamics of Wikipedia articles’ revisions over time. In a semantically stablesystem, articles are infrequently edited, whereas in unstable systems, article contentchanges more frequently. In other words, in a stable system, the Wikipedia com-munity has reached consensus on the majority of articles. In our work, we measuresemantic stability using the Rank Biased Overlap method. To that end, we prepro-cess Wikipedia dumps to obtain a sequence of plain-text article revisions, whereaseach revision is represented as a TF-IDF vector. To measure the similarity betweenconsequent article revisions, we calculate Rank Biased Overlap on subsequent termvectors. We evaluate our approach on 10 Wikipedia language editions includingthe five largest language editions as well as five randomly selected small languageeditions. Our experimental results reveal that even in policy driven collaborationnetworks such as Wikipedia, semantic stability can be achieved. However, there aredifferences on the velocity of the semantic stability process between small and largeWikipedia editions. Small editions exhibit faster and higher semantic stability than large ones. In particular, in large Wikipedia editions, a higher number of successiverevisions is needed in order to reach a certain semantic stability level, whereas, insmall Wikipedia editions, the number of needed successive revisions is much lowerfor the same level of semantic stability.
2016

Hasani-Mavriqi Ilire, Geigl Florian, Pujari Subhash Chandra , Lex Elisabeth, Helic Denis

The Influence of Social Status and Network Structure on Consensus Building in Collaboration Networks

Social Network Analysis and Mining, Reda Alhajj, Springer Vienna, 2016

Journal
In this paper, we study the process of opinion dynamics and consensus building in online collaboration systems, in which users interact with each other following their common interests and their social profiles. Specifically, we are interested in how users similarity and their social status in the community, as well as the interplay of those two factors influence the process of consensus dynamics. For our study, we simulate the diffusion of opinions in collaboration systems using the well-known Naming Game model, which we extend by incorporating an interaction mechanism based on user similarity and user social status. We conduct our experiments on collaborative datasets extracted from the Web. Our findings reveal that when users are guided by their similarity to other users, the process of consensus building in online collaboration systems is delayed. A suitable increase of influence of user social status on their actions can in turn facilitate this process. In summary, our results suggest that achieving an optimal consensus building process in collaboration systems requires an appropriate balance between those two factors.
2016

Kowald Dominik, Lex Elisabeth, Kopeinik Simone

Which Algorithms Suit Which Learning Environments? A Comparative Study of Recommender Systems in TEL

European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning, EC-TEL'2016, Springer, Toledo, Spain, 2016

Konferenz
In recent years, a number of recommendation algorithmshave been proposed to help learners find suitable learning resources online.Next to user-centered evaluations, offline-datasets have been usedto investigate new recommendation algorithms or variations of collaborativefiltering approaches. However, a more extensive study comparinga variety of recommendation strategies on multiple TEL datasets ismissing. In this work, we contribute with a data-driven study of recommendationstrategies in TEL to shed light on their suitability forTEL datasets. To that end, we evaluate six state-of-the-art recommendationalgorithms for tag and resource recommendations on six empiricaldatasets: a dataset from European Schoolnets TravelWell, a dataset fromthe MACE portal, which features access to meta-data-enriched learningresources from the field of architecture, two datasets from the socialbookmarking systems BibSonomy and CiteULike, a MOOC dataset fromthe KDD challenge 2015, and Aposdle, a small-scale workplace learningdataset. We highlight strengths and shortcomings of the discussed recommendationalgorithms and their applicability to the TEL datasets.Our results demonstrate that the performance of the algorithms stronglydepends on the properties and characteristics of the particular dataset.However, we also find a strong correlation between the average numberof users per resource and the algorithm performance. A tag recommenderevaluation experiment reveals that a hybrid combination of a cognitiveinspiredand a popularity-based approach consistently performs best onall TEL datasets we utilized in our study.
2016

Santoz Patricia, Dennerlein Sebastian, Theiler Dieter, Cool John, Trasure-Jones Tamsin, Holley Debbie, Kerr Micky , Atwell Graham, Kowald Dominik, Lex Elisabeth

Going beyond your Personal Learning Network, using Recommendations and Trust through a Multimedia Question-Answering Service for Decision-support: a Case Study in the Healthcare

Journal of Universal Computer Science, J.UCS, J. UCS Consortium, 2016

Journal
Social learning networks enable the sharing, transfer and enhancement of knowledge in the workplace that builds the ground to exchange informal learning practices. In this work, three healthcare networks are studied in order to understand how to enable the building, maintaining and activation of new contacts at work and the exchange of knowledge between them. By paying close attention to the needs of the practitioners, we aimed to understand how personal and social learning could be supported by technological services exploiting social networks and the respective traces reflected in the semantics. This paper presents a case study reporting on the results of two co-design sessions and elicits requirements showing the importance of scaffolding strategies in personal and shared learning networks. Besides, the significance of these strategies to aggregate trust among peers when sharing resources and decision-support when exchanging questions and answers. The outcome is a set of design criteria to be used for further technical development for a social tool. We conclude with the lessons learned and future work.
2016

Dennerlein Sebastian, Treasure-Jones Tamsin, Lex Elisabeth, Ley Tobias

The role of collaboration and shared understanding in interprofessional teamwork

AMEE - International Conference of Medical Education 2016, AMEE 2016, 2016

Journal
Background: Teamworking, within and acrosshealthcare organisations, is essential to deliverexcellent integrated care. Drawing upon an alternationof collaborative and cooperative phases, we exploredthis teamworking and respective technologicalsupport within UK Primary Care. Participants usedBits&Pieces (B&P), a sensemaking tool for tracedexperiences that allows sharing results and mutuallyelaborating them: i.e. cooperating and/orcollaborating.Summary of Work: We conducted a two month-longcase study involving six healthcare professionals. InB&P, they reviewed organizational processes, whichrequired the involvement of different professions ineither collaborative and/or cooperative manner. Weused system-usage data, interviews and qualitativeanalysis to understand the interplay of teamworkingpracticeand technology.Summary of Results: Within our analysis we mainlyidentified cooperation phases. In a f2f-meeting,professionals collaboratively identified subtasks andassigned individuals leading collaboration on them.However, these subtasks were undertaken asindividual sensemaking efforts and finally combined(i.e. cooperation). We found few examples ofreciprocal interpretation processes (i.e. collaboration):e.g. discussing problems during sensemaking ormonitoring other’s sensemaking-outcomes to makesuggestions.Discussion: These patterns suggest that collaborationin healthcare often helps to construct a minimalshared understanding (SU) of subtasks to engage incooperation, where individuals trust in other’scompetencies and autonomous completion. However,we also found that professionals with positivecollaboration history and deepened SU were willing toundertake subtasks collaboratively. It seems thatacquiring such deepened SU of concepts andmethods, leads to benefits that motivate professionalsto collaborate more.Conclusion: Healthcare is a challenging environmentrequiring interprofessional work across organisations.For effective teamwork, a deepened SU is crucial andboth cooperation and collaboration are required.However, we found a tendency of staff to rely mainlyon cooperation when working in teams and not fullyexplore benefits of collaboration.Take Home Messages: To maximise benefits ofinterprofessional working, tools for teamworkingshould support both cooperation and collaborationprocesses and scaffold the move between them
2016

Kopeinik Simone, Kowald Dominik, Hasani-Mavriqi Ilire, Lex Elisabeth

Improving Collaborative Filtering Using a Cognitive Model of Human Category Learning

Journal of WebScience, James Finlay, Now publishing, 2016

Journal
Classic resource recommenders like Collaborative Filteringtreat users as just another entity, thereby neglecting non-linear user-resource dynamics that shape attention and in-terpretation. SUSTAIN, as an unsupervised human cate-gory learning model, captures these dynamics. It aims tomimic a learner’s categorization behavior. In this paper, weuse three social bookmarking datasets gathered from Bib-Sonomy, CiteULike and Delicious to investigate SUSTAINas a user modeling approach to re-rank and enrich Collab-orative Filtering following a hybrid recommender strategy.Evaluations against baseline algorithms in terms of recom-mender accuracy and computational complexity reveal en-couraging results. Our approach substantially improves Col-laborative Filtering and, depending on the dataset, success-fully competes with a computationally much more expen-sive Matrix Factorization variant. In a further step, we ex-plore SUSTAIN’s dynamics in our specific learning task andshow that both memorization of a user’s history and clus-tering, contribute to the algorithm’s performance. Finally,we observe that the users’ attentional foci determined bySUSTAIN correlate with the users’ level of curiosity, iden-tified by the SPEAR algorithm. Overall, the results ofour study show that SUSTAIN can be used to efficientlymodel attention-interpretation dynamics of users and canhelp improve Collaborative Filtering for resource recommen-dations.
2016

Kowald Dominik, Lex Elisabeth

The Influence of Frequency, Recency and Semantic Context on the Reuse of Tags in Social Tagging Systems

27th ACM Conference on Hypertext and Hypermedia, Hypertext'2016, ACM, Halifax, 2016

Konferenz
In this paper, we study factors that in uence tag reuse behavior in social tagging systems. Our work is guided by the activation equation of the cognitive model ACT-R, which states that the usefulness of information in human memory depends on the three factors usage frequency, recency and semantic context. It is our aim to shed light on the in uence of these factors on tag reuse. In our experiments, we utilize six datasets from the social tagging systems Flickr, CiteULike, BibSonomy, Delicious, LastFM and MovieLens, covering a range of various tagging settings. Our results con rm that frequency, recency and semantic context positively in uence the reuse probability of tags. However, the extent to which each factor individually in uences tag reuse strongly depends on the type of folksonomy present in a social tagging system. Our work can serve as guideline for researchers and developers of tag-based recommender systems when designing algorithms for social tagging environments.
2016

Kraker Peter, Peters Ines, Lex Elisabeth, Gumpenberger Christian , Gorraiz Juan

Research data explored: an extended analysis of citations and alt metrics

Journal of Scientometrics, Springer Link, Springer-Verlag, Cham, 2016

Journal
In this study, we explore the citedness of research data, its distribution over time and its relation to the availability of a digital object identifier (DOI) in the Thomson Reuters database Data Citation Index (DCI). We investigate if cited research data ‘‘im- pacts’’ the (social) web, reflected by altmetrics scores, and if there is any relationship between the number of citations and the sum of altmetrics scores from various social media platforms. Three tools are used to collect altmetrics scores, namely PlumX, ImpactStory, and Altmetric.com, and the corresponding results are compared. We found that out of the three altmetrics tools, PlumX has the best coverage. Our experiments revealed that research data remain mostly uncited (about 85 %), although there has been an increase in citing data sets published since 2008. The percentage of the number of cited research data with a DOI in DCI has decreased in the last years. Only nine repositories are responsible for research data with DOIs and two or more citations. The number of cited research data with altmetrics ‘‘foot-prints’’ is even lower (4–9 %) but shows a higher coverage of research data from the last decade. In our study, we also found no correlation between the number of citations and the total number of altmetrics scores. Yet, certain data types (i.e. survey, aggregate data, and sequence data) are more often cited and also receive higher altmetrics scores. Additionally, we performed citation and altmetric analyses of all research data published between 2011 and 2013 in four different disciplines covered by the DCI. In general, these results correspond very well with the ones obtained for research data cited at least twice and also show low numbers in citations and in altmetrics. Finally, we observed that there are disciplinary differences in the availability and extent of altmetrics scores.
2016

Dennerlein Sebastian, Ley Tobias, , Lex Elisabeth, Seitlinger Paul

Take up my Tags: Exploring Benefits of Collaborative Learning in a Social Tagging Field Study at the Workplace

European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning (EC-TEL 2016), EC-TEL 2016, Springer-Verlag, Cham, 2016

Konferenz
In the digital realm, meaning making is reflected in the reciprocal manipulation of mediating artefacts. We understand uptake, i.e. interaction with and understanding of others’ artefact interpretations, as central mechanism and investigate its impact on individual and social learning at work. Results of our social tagging field study indicate that increased uptake of others’ tags is related to a higher shared understanding of collaborators as well as narrower and more elaborative exploration in individual information search. We attribute the social and individual impact to accommodative processes in the high uptake condition.
2016

Lacic Emanuel, Kowald Dominik, Lex Elisabeth

High Enough? Explaining and Predicting Traveler Satisfaction Using Airline Reviews.

27th ACM Conference on Hypertext and Hypermedia, Hypertext'2016, ACM, Halifax, 2016

Konferenz
Air travel is one of the most frequently used means of transportation in our every-day life. Thus, it is not surprising that an increasing number of travelers share their experiences with airlines and airports in form of online reviews on the Web. In this work, we thrive to explain and uncover the features of airline reviews that contribute most to traveler satisfaction. To that end, we examine reviews crawled from the Skytrax air travel review portal. Skytrax provides four review categories to review airports, lounges, airlines and seats. Each review category consists of several five-star ratings as well as free-text review content. In this paper, we conducted a comprehensive feature study and we find that not only five-star rating information such as airport queuing time and lounge comfort highly correlate with traveler satisfaction but also textual features in the form of the inferred review text sentiment. Based on our findings, we created classifiers to predict traveler satisfaction using the best performing rating features. Our results reveal that given our methodology, traveler satisfaction can be predicted with high accuracy. Additionally, we find that training a model on the sentiment of the review text provides a competitive alternative when no five star rating information is available. We believe that our work is of interest for researchers in the area of modeling and predicting user satisfaction based on available review data on the Web.
2016

Luzhnica Granit, Simon Jörg Peter, Lex Elisabeth, Pammer-Schindler Viktoria

A Sliding Window Approach to Natural Hand Gesture Recognition using a Custom Data Glove

Proceedings of the IEEE 3DUI 2016 Symposium on 3D User Interfaces, IEEE, Greenville, SC, USA, 2016

Konferenz
This paper explores the recognition of hand gestures based on a data glove equipped with motion, bending and pressure sensors. We se- lected 31 natural and interaction-oriented hand gestures that can be adopted for general-purpose control of and communication with computing systems. The data glove is custom-built, and contains 13 bend sensors, 7 motion sensors, 5 pressure sensors and a magne- tometer. We present the data collection experiment, as well as the design, selection and evaluation of a classification algorithm. As we use a sliding window approach to data processing, our algorithm is suitable for stream data processing. Algorithm selection and feature engineering resulted in a combination of linear discriminant anal- ysis and logistic regression with which we achieve an accuracy of over 98. 5% on a continuous data stream scenario. When removing the computationally expensive FFT-based features, we still achieve an accuracy of 98. 2%.
2016

Malarkodi C. S., Lex Elisabeth, Sobha Lalitha Devi

Named Entity Recognition for the Agricultural Domain

17th International Conference on Intelligent Text Processing and Computational Linguistics (CICLING 2016); Research in Computing Science, CICLING 2016, Springer Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Konya, Turkey, 2016

Konferenz
Agricultural data have a major role in the planning and success of rural development activi ties. Agriculturalists, planners, policy makers, gover n- ment officials, farmers and researchers require relevant information to trigger decision making processes. This paper presents our approach towards extracting named entities from real - world agricultura l data from different areas of agricu l- ture using Conditional Random Fields (CRFs). Specifically, we have created a Named Entity tagset consisting of 19 fine grained tags. To the best of our knowledge, there is no specific tag set and annotated corpus avail able for the agricultural domain. We have performed several experiments using different combination of features and obtained encouraging results. Most of the issues observed in an error analysis have been addressed by post - processing heuristic rules, which resulted in a significant improvement of our system’s accuracy
2016

Dennerlein Sebastian, Lex Elisabeth, Ruiz-Calleja Adolfo, Ley Elisabeth

Visualizing workplace learning data with the SSS Dashboard

Learning Analytics for Workplace and Professional Learning (LA for Work) workshop at LAK 2016, CEUR Workshop Proceedings, Edinburgh, 2016

Konferenz
This paper reports the design and development of a visual Dashboard, called the SSS Dashboard, which visualizes data from informal workplace learning processes from different viewpoints. The SSS Dashboard retrieves its data from the Social Semantic Server (SSS), an infrastructure that integrates data from several workplace learning applications into a semantically-enriched Artifact-Actor Network. A first evaluation with end users in a course for professional teachers gave promising results. Both a trainer and a learner could understand the learning process from different perspectives using the SSS Dashboard. The results obtained will pave the way for the development of future Learning Analytics applications that exploit the data collected by the SSS.
2015

Cook John, Ley Tobias, Maier Ronald, Mor Yishay, Santos Patricia, Lex Elisabeth, Dennerlein Sebastian, Trattner Christoph, Holley Debbie

Using the Hybrid Social Learning Network to Explore Concepts, Practices, Designs and Smart Services for Networked Professional Learning

In Proceedings of the International Conference on Smart Learning Environments 2015 (ICSLE 2015), Springer, Sinaia, Romania, 2015

Konferenz
In this paper we define the notion of the Hybrid Social Learning Network. We propose mechanisms for interlinking and enhancing both the practice of professional learning and theories on informal learning. Our approach shows how we employ empirical and design work and a participatory pattern workshop to move from (kernel) theories via Design Principles and prototypes to social machines articulating the notion of a HSLN. We illustrate this approach with the example of Help Seeking for healthcare professionals.
2015

Lex Elisabeth, Dennerlein Sebastian

HowTo: Scientific Work in Interdisciplinary and Distributed Teams

In: Science 2.0, IEEE Computer Society Special Technical Community on Social Networking E-Letter, vol. 3, no. 1, IEEE, 2015

Journal
Today's complex scientific problems often require interdisciplinary, team-oriented approaches: the expertise of researchers from different disciplines is needed to collaboratively reach a solution. Interdisciplinary teams yet face many challenges such as differences in research practice, terminology, communication , and in the usage of tools. In this paper, we therefore study concrete mechanisms and tools of two real-world scientific projects with the aim to examine their efficacy and influence on interdisciplinary teamwork. For our study, we draw upon Bronstein's model of interdisciplinary collaboration. We found that it is key to use suitable environments for communication and collaboration, especially when teams are geographically distributed. Plus, the willingness to share (domain) knowledge is not a given and requires strong common goals and incentives. Besides, structural barriers such as financial aspects can hinder interdisciplinary work, especially in applied, industry funded research. Furthermore, we observed a kind of cold-start problem in interdisciplinary collaboration, when there is no work history and when the disciplines are rather different, e.g. in terms of wording. HowTo: Scientific Work in Interdisciplinary and Distributed Teams (PDF Download Available). Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/282813815_HowTo_Scientific_Work_in_Interdisciplinary_and_Distributed_Teams [accessed Jul 13, 2017].
2015

Seitlinger Paul, Kowald Dominik, Kopeinik Simone, Hasani-Mavriqi Ilire, Ley Tobias, Lex Elisabeth

Attention Please! A Hybrid Resource Recommender Mimicking Attention-Interpretation Dynamics

In 24rd International World Wide Web Conference, Web-Science Track, Aldo Gangemi, Stefano Leonardi and Alessandro Panconesi, ACM, Florence, 2015

Konferenz
Classic resource recommenders like Collaborative Filtering(CF) treat users as being just another entity, neglecting non-linear user-resource dynamics shaping attention and inter-pretation. In this paper, we propose a novel hybrid rec-ommendation strategy that re nes CF by capturing thesedynamics. The evaluation results reveal that our approachsubstantially improves CF and, depending on the dataset,successfully competes with a computationally much moreexpensive Matrix Factorization variant.
2015

Kraker Peter, Lex Elisabeth, Gorraiz, J., Gumpenberger, C., Peters, I.

Research Data Explored II: the Anatomy and Reception of figshare

n Proceedings of the 20th International Conference on Science and Technology Indicators (STI 2015), Lugano, Schweiz, 2015

Konferenz
2015

Kraker Peter, Enkhbayar Asuraa, Lex Elisabeth

Exploring Coverage and Distribution of Identifiers on the Scholarly Web

In Proceedings of the 14th International Symposium of Information Science – ISI 2015, Zadar, Croatia, 2015

Konferenz
In a scientific publishing environment that is increasingly moving online, identifiers of scholarly work are gaining in importance. In this paper, we analysed identifier distribution and coverage of articles from the discipline of quantitative biology using arXiv, Mendeley and CrossRef as data sources. The results show that when retrieving arXiv articles from Mendeley, we were able to find more papers using the DOI than the arXiv ID. This indicates that DOI may be a better identifier with respect to findability. We also find that coverage of articles on Mendeley decreases in the most recent years, whereas the coverage of DOIs does not decrease in the same order of magnitude. This hints at the fact that there is a certain time lag involved, before articles are covered in crowd-sourced services on the scholarly web.
2015

Peters, I, Kraker Peter, Lex Elisabeth, Gumpenberger C., Gorraiz, J.

Research Data Explored: Citations versus Altmetrics

15th International Conference on Scientometrics and Informetrics, Online, 2015

Konferenz
The study explores the citedness of research data, its distribution over time and how it is related to the availability of a DOI (Digital Object Identifier) in Thomson Reuters' DCI (Data Citation Index). We investigate if cited research data "impact" the (social) web, reflected by altmetrics scores, and if there is any relationship between the number of citations and the sum of altmetrics scores from various social media-platforms. Three tools are used to collect and compare altmetrics scores, i.e. PlumX, ImpactStory, and Altmetric.com. In terms of coverage, PlumX is the most helpful altmetrics tool. While research data remain mostly uncited (about 85%), there has been a growing trend in citing data sets published since 2007. Surprisingly, the percentage of the number of cited research data with a DOI in DCI has decreased in the last years. Only nine repositories account for research data with DOIs and two or more citations. The number of cited research data with altmetrics scores is even lower (4 to 9%) but shows a higher coverage of research data from the last decade. However, no correlation between the number of citations and the total number of altmetrics scores is observable. Certain data types (i.e. survey, aggregate data, and sequence data) are more often cited and receive higher altmetrics scores.
2015

Ruiz-Calleja Adolfo, Dennerlein Sebastian, Tomberg Vladimir , Pata Kai, Ley Tobias, Theiler Dieter, Lex Elisabeth

Supporting learning analytics for informal workplace learning with a social semantic infrastructure

In Proceedings of the European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning, Springer International Publishing (in press)., Springer, Toledo, Spain, 2015

Konferenz
This paper presents the potential of a social semantic infrastructure that implements an Actor Artifact Network (AAN) with the final goal of supporting learning analytics at the workplace. Two applications were built on top of such infrastructure and make use of the emerging relations of such a AAN. A preliminary evaluation shows that an AAN can be created out of the usage of both applications, thus opening the possibility to implement learning analytics at the workplace.
2015

Hasani-Mavriqi Ilire, Geigl Florian, Pujari Subhash Chandra, Lex Elisabeth, Helic Denis

Influence of Status Social on Consensus Building in Collaboration Networks

In Proceedings of the IEEE/ACM International Conference on Advances in Social Networks Analysis and Mining (ASONAM 2015), Jian Pei, Fabrizio Silvestri and Jie Tang, ACM/IEEE, Paris, France, 2015

Konferenz
In this paper, we analyze the influence of social status on opinion dynamics and consensus building in collaboration networks. To that end, we simulate the diffusion of opinions in empirical collaboration networks by taking into account both the network structure and the individual differences of people reflected through their social status. For our simulations, we adapt a well-known Naming Game model and extend it with the Probabilistic Meeting Rule to account for the social status of individuals participating in a meeting. This mechanism is sufficiently flexible and allows us to model various situations in collaboration networks, such as the emergence or disappearance of social classes. In this work, we concentrate on studying three well-known forms of class society: egalitarian, ranked and stratified. In particular, we are interested in the way these society forms facilitate opinion diffusion. Our experimental findings reveal that (i) opinion dynamics in collaboration networks is indeed affected by the individuals’ social status and (ii) this effect is intricate and non-obvious. In particular, although the social status favors consensus building, relying on it too strongly can slow down the opinion diffusion, indicating that there is a specific setting for each collaboration network in which social status optimally benefits the consensus building process.
2015

Dennerlein Sebastian, Treasure Jones T, Tomberg V, Theiler Dieter, Lex Elisabeth, Ley Tobias

Making Sense of Informal Learning at the Workplace

AMEE - Conference (The Association for Medical Education in Europe), Glasgow, UK, 2015

Konferenz
Sensemaking at the workplace and in educational contexts has been extensively studied for decades. Interestingly, making sense out of the own wealth of learning experiences at the workplace has been widely ignored. To tackle this issue, we have implemented a novel sensemaking interface for healthcare professionals to support learning at the workplace. The proposed prototype supports remembering of informal experiences from episodic memory followed by sensemaking in semantic memory. Results from an initial study conducted as part of an iterative co-design process reveal the prototype is being perceived as useful and supportive for informal sensemaking by study participants from the healthcare domain. Furthermore, we find first evidence that re-evaluation of collected information is a potentially necessary process that needs further exploration to fully understand and support sensemaking of informal learning experiences.
2015

Dennerlein Sebastian, Theiler Dieter, Marton Peter, Lindstaedt Stefanie , Lex Elisabeth, Santos Rodriguez Patricia, Cook John

KnowBrain: An Online Social Knowledge Repository for Informal Workplace Learning

In Proceedings of the European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning, Springer International Publishing (in press)., Springer, Toledo, Spain, 2015

Konferenz
We present KnowBrain (KB), an open source Dropbox-like knowledge repository with social features for informal workplace learning. KB enables users (i) to share and collaboratively structure knowledge, (ii) to access knowledge via sophisticated content- and metadatabased search and recommendation, and (iii) to discuss artefacts by means of multimedia-enriched Q&A. As such, KB can support, integrate and foster various collaborative learning processes related to daily work-tasks.
2015

Kowald Dominik, Lex Elisabeth

Evaluating Tag Recommender Algorithms in Real-World Folksonomies: A Comparative Study

Proceedings of 9th International Conference on Recommender Systems, RecSys'2015, ACM, Vienna, Austria, 2015

Konferenz
To date, the evaluation of tag recommender algorithms has mostly been conducted in limited ways, including $p$-core pruned datasets, a small set of compared algorithms and solely based on recommender accuracy. In this study, we use an open-source evaluation framework to compare a rich set of state-of-the-art algorithms in six unfiltered, open datasets via various metrics, measuring not only accuracy but also the diversity, novelty and computational costs of the approaches. We therefore provide a transparent and reproducible tag recommender evaluation in real-world folksonomies. Our results suggest that the efficacy of an algorithm highly depends on the given needs and thus, they should be of interest to both researchers and developers in the field of tag-based recommender systems.
2015

Lacic Emanuel, Luzhnica Granit, Simon Jörg Peter, Traub Matthias, Lex Elisabeth, Kowald Dominik

Tackling Cold-Start Users in Recommender Systems with Indoor Positioning Systems

Proceedings of 9th International Conference on Recommender Systems, RecSys'2015, ACM, Vienna, Austria, 2015

Konferenz
In this paper, we present work-in-progress on a recommender system based on Collaborative Filtering that exploits location information gathered by indoor positioning systems. This approach allows us to provide recommendations for "extreme" cold-start users with absolutely no item interaction data available, where methods based on Matrix Factorization would not work. We simulate and evaluate our proposed system using data from the location-based FourSquare system and show that we can provide substantially better recommender accuracy results than a simple MostPopular baseline that is typically used when no interaction data is available.
2015

Lacic Emanuel, Traub Matthias, Kowald Dominik, Lex Elisabeth

ScaR: Towards a Real-Time Recommender Framework Following the Microservices Architecture

In the Large-Scale Recommender Systems Workshop (LSRS'15) at the 9th International Conference on Recommender Systems, RecSys'2015, ACM, Vienna, Austria, 2015

Konferenz
In this paper, we present our approach towards an effective scalable recommender framework termed ScaR. Our framework is based on the microservices architecture and exploits search technology to provide real-time recommendations. Since it is our aim to create a system that can be used in a broad range of scenarios, we designed it to be capable of handling various data streams and sources. We show its efficacy and scalability with an initial experiment on how the framework can be used in a large-scale setting.
2015

Dennerlein Sebastian, Kowald Dominik, Lex Elisabeth, Lacic Emanuel, Theiler Dieter, Ley Tobias

The Social Semantic Server: A Flexible Framework to Support Informal Learning at the Workplace

In Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Knowledge Technologies and Data-Driven Business, i-know 2015, ACM, Graz, Austria, 2015

Konferenz
Informal learning at the workplace includes a multitude of processes. Respective activities can be categorized into multiple perspectives on informal learning, such as reflection, sensemaking, help seeking and maturing of collective knowledge. Each perspective raises requirements with respect to the technical support, this is why an integrated solution relying on social, adaptive and semantic technologies is needed. In this paper, we present the Social Semantic Server, an extensible, open-source application server that equips clientside tools with services to support and scale informal learning at the workplace. More specifically, the Social Semantic Server semantically enriches social data that is created at the workplace in the context of user-to-user or user-artifact interactions. This enriched data can then in turn be exploited in informal learning scenarios to, e.g., foster help seeking by recommending collaborators, resources, or experts. Following the design-based research paradigm, the Social Semantic Server has been implemented based on design principles, which were derived from theories such as Distributed Cognition and Meaning Making. We illustrate the applicability and efficacy of the Social Semantic Server in the light of three real-world applications that have been developed using its social semantic services. Furthermore, we report preliminary results of two user studies that have been carried out recently.
2015

Pujari Subhash Chandra, Hadgu Asmelah Teka, Lex Elisabeth, Jäschke Robert

Social Activity versus Academic Activity: A Case Study of Computer Scientists on Twitter

In Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Knowledge Technologies and Data-Driven Business (i-KNOW 2015), ACM, Graz, Austria, 2015

Konferenz
In this work, we study social and academic network activities of researchers from Computer Science. Using a recently proposed framework, we map the researchers to their Twitter accounts and link them to their publications. This enables us to create two types of networks: first, networks that reflect social activities on Twitter, namely the researchers’ follow, retweet and mention networks and second, networks that reflect academic activities, that is the co-authorship and citation networks. Based on these datasets, we (i) compare the social activities of researchers with their academic activities, (ii) investigate the consistency and similarity of communities within the social and academic activity networks, and (iii) investigate the information flow between different areas of Computer Science in and between both types of networks. Our findings show that if co-authors interact on Twitter, their relationship is reciprocal, increasing with the numbers of papers they co-authored. In general, the social and the academic activities are not correlated. In terms of community analysis, we found that the three social activity networks are most consistent with each other, with the highest consistency between the retweet and mention network. A study of information flow revealed that in the follow network, researchers from Data Management, HumanComputer Interaction, and Artificial Intelligence act as a source of information for other areas in Computer Science.
2015

Traub Matthias, Kowald Dominik, Lacic Emanuel, Lex Elisabeth, Schoen Pepjin, Supp Gernot

Smart booking without looking: providing hotel recommendations in the TripRebel portal

Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Knowledge Technologies and Data-driven Business, i-know 2015, ACM, Graz, Austria, 2015

Konferenz
In this paper, we present a scalable hotel recommender system for TripRebel, a new online booking portal. On the basis of the open-source enterprise search platform Apache Solr, we developed a system architecture with Web-based services to interact with indexed data at large scale as well as to provide hotel recommendations using various state-of-the-art recommender algorithms. We demonstrate the efficiency of our system directly using the live TripRebel portal where, in its current state, hotel alternatives for a given hotel are calculated based on data gathered from the Expedia AffiliateNetwork (EAN).
2015

Ruiz-Calleja Adolfo, Dennerlein Sebastian, Tomberg Vladimir , Ley Tobias , Theiler Dieter, Lex Elisabeth

Integrating data across workplace learning applications with a social semantic infrastructure

Proceedings of the International Conference on Web-based Learning, Springer International Publishing, Hong Kong, China, 2015

Konferenz
This paper presents our experiences using a social semantic infrastructure that implements a semantically-enriched Actor Artifact Network (AAN) to support informal learning at the workplace. Our previous research led us to define the Model of Scaling Informal Learning, to identify several common practices when learning happens at the workplace, and to propose a social semantic infrastructure able to support them. This paper shows this support by means of two illustrative examples where practitioners employed several applications integrated into the infrastructure. Thus, this paper clarifies how workplace learning processes can be supported with such infrastructure according to the aforementioned model. The initial analysis of these experiences gives promising results since it shows how the infrastructure mediates in the sharing of contextualized learning artifacts and how it builds up an AAN that makes explicit the relationships between actors and artifacts when learning at the workplace.
2014

Lex Elisabeth, Kraker Peter, Dennerlein Sebastian

What Really Works: Reflections on Applied Methods in a Real World Interdisciplinary Project

Interdisciplinary Coups to Calamities Workshop at ACM Web Science, 2014

Today’s data driven world requires interdisciplinary, teamoriented approaches: experts from different disciplines are needed to collaboratively solve complex real-world problems. Interdisciplinary teams face a set of challenges that are not necessarily encountered by unidisciplinary teams, such as organisational culture, mental and financial barriers. We share our experiences with interdisciplinary teamwork based on a real-world example. We found that models of interdisciplinary teamwork from Social Sciences and Web Science can guide interdisciplinary teamwork in the domain of pharmaceutical knowledge management. Additionally, we identified potential extensions of the models’ components as well as novel influencing factors such the willingness to explicate and share domain knowledge.
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